Auburn women look for breakthrough at LSU

Jan. 22, 2014

By Phillip Marshall
AuburnTigers.com

Second-year Auburn women's basketball coach Terri Williams-Flournoy says her team is good or getting better. Her players just need to convince themselves.

The Tigers have opened Southeastern Conference play with a grueling stretch. The result is they are 11-7 overall and 2-3 in the league. All three losses have come at home against ranked teams.

"We have played some really good teams in the SEC, top teams in the country, and I think we have played really well against them," Williams-Flournoy said. "At this point, we need to get a victory so that our players can understand that they are good and that they are playing well just to get over that hump."

But it doesn't get any easier. Next up is No. 15 LSU (14-4, 3-2) in Baton Rouge on Thursday night at 7.

"Going to LSU is going to be tough," Williams-Flournoy said. "Anytime you are playing on another opponent's court, especially in the SEC, it is extremely tough. We played LSU twice last year, and both times I thought we played well enough that we should have won. There were a few mistakes here and there that we need to clean up and get better at to get that victory we need."

Auburn took No. 10 Kentucky to the final second, falling 73-71 on Sunday without injured senior guard Hasina Muhammad.

Senior Tyrese Tanner leads four Auburn players averaging in double figures with 17.1 points per game. Muhammad averages 12.2, freshman Brandy Montgomery 11.1 and sophomore Tra'Cee Tanner 10.2. Tra'Cee Tanner also averages 6.1 rebounds per game.


 

 

LSU, with all of its losses to ranked teams, is led by Theresa Plaisance with team highs of 13.8 points and 7.0 rebounds. Jeanne Kenney averages 11.2 points per game and has hit 41 3-pointers.

"They have some really good players, steady players, experienced players," Williams-Flournoy said. "...  They are inside, outside, they can penetrate, they can shoot the 3, they can score inside and then they can play this 2-3 match up type zone. If you think about it too much, you have a tendency to stand around and try to figure it out instead of just being aggressive and attack it."

 
       

Phillip Marshall is a Senior Writer for AuburnTigers.com. Follow Marshall on Twitter: